architecture

Tranquil Sunday

Red maple eh

I left earlier than usual, having heard the meteorologists say: rain later! I set off on a typical wander, looking for photo potential. Mmmm, maple “helicopters.” Perhaps for red maples? haha

Lion planter detail

Mmmm, a lion detail on a planter…. Hmmm? where’s the traffic?

Race clog

Oh. Foot race. Hence, streets closed off, so, hmmm, an especially traffic free neighborhood, even for a Sunday!

Tranquil until the thunderstorm! Which now has passed. Whew. All is well. Wet, yes, but well.

Jux stah…

Old n new

It’s all about juxtaposition.

Lacey outlines

It’s all about shadows and shadow-makers. And orange cones? Wha?

Bathroom fixture

It’s all about bathroom interior decoration…light fixture/ceiling…dare I say?…juxtaposition.

Suuuuuuhnee day

Wall shadows

I liked the shadows, and the shapes of the leaves/vegetation that made them, juxtaposed with the warm browns of the wall stone.

Deciduous magnolia

For those craving flowers, here’s a deciduous magnolia…

Forsythia in bloom

…and forsythia—outdoor forsythia, somehow mixed with a holly. Seem to be strange phyto-bedfellows to me.

Full sun = vitamin D

Japanese magnolia bud

Japanese magnolia bud. They were open on another tree, but this one was all bud.

Golden crocus

Golden crocus. Croci.

Fireplug silver

Silver fireplug with two columnar friends. Buds?

White fences

Round finial

Finials are not newels, but may be atop newels.

Round finial.

Knurled finial

Knurled finial.

RTT has ended

Six flags partial

Coming into Atlanta from the west, the interstate passes by a major amusement park just before it descends to cross the Chattahoochee River.

View E ATL

At night, the view of the city is…twinkly.

With this post, I report the end of the Rainbow Triangle Trip. Accomplished all goals, foremost among them seeing loved ones. Fun trip; and, simultaneously happy to be home.

Change of perspective

Cloudlayer above

I think this morning we drove under the last of the dense cloud layers that we’re likely to see in Cali. I enjoyed seeing the sun on the flanks of the hills…

Drive up into cloud

…and ahead of us as we climbed into the visible humidity.

Derricks

We even found at least two large herds of mechanical dragons.

Dry hills

Then, we crossed a pass, and, zip, no more clouds.

Bird Paradise

And into the city, the giant metro area. This species is the city flower. A showy choice as you’d expect for LA.

LACityHall

Here’s the City Hall tower; you’ve seen it in many movies and TV shows.

Shoeshine

And, in the busy train station, a for-real shoeshine stand.

Under the tracks

Here’s the busy corridor that crosses under the tracks, allowing access to each of the tracks above. Cops arrived in the golf cart; the fine is at least $1500 for going up to the tracks without a valid ticket, the sign said. We just didn’t get caught. Heh.

BTW, this city traffic, wow, exhausting. Sleepy-time for this blahger….

Divided road

Lighthouse lowprofile

Isn’t that the cutest low-profile lighthouse? Cali-cute!

Mar pacifico

And there’s the Mar Pacifico—today not terribly pacifico. You can’t see the wind and blowing rain. Elegant, enduring seastacks….

Pacifico long swells

Love the marching swells cut below by the long shallow sea-edge profile.

Elk herd grazing

NoCal tourism touts the elk herds. Here’s one. Grazing and resting. Classic elk-life, when carnivores are not threatening.

Avenue giants trees

Coastal NoCal also hosts trees—not only the giant redwoods pictured here.

Cloud forest

During the rainy season, the trees and clouds may merge. This shot is from a high-elevation meadow called in these parts a prairie. [Note: this use of “prairie” is not a Boontling term.]

Redwood newbies

We took our walk in a section of the 🎶redwood forest🎶 we had not walked in before. I remember almost always seeing lone trees, or perhaps pairs. Here’s a circle of relative newbie trees. I did not find out if they are clones of the dead stump in the center, or if the rotting stump provided a hospitable microenvironment for whatever seeds were at its base to germinate.

Redwood bark CU

For contrast: lichen growth on twists of redwood bark at a tree base.

Post title refers to a Cali term we kept encountering on road signs…which seemed to have been a pet term by some transportation engineers, rather than a road situation of great distinction for drivers. The first we encountered had a small curb between the two lanes that otherwise seemed like a regular two-lane road; another had merely a marked off paved area about a foot wide between the two directions—no elevation change whatsoever—and two lanes each way. Diversity in them thar divided roads….

Unlocked

Wave statues Ballard

We always enjoy our visit to the locks in the Ballard neighborhood, NW Seattle. The official name of this waterway is Salmon Bay; it’s the seaward link for the waters of Lake Washington, which flow into the Shilshole (say: shill-shoal) Bay of Puget Sound. The passage is also called the Lake Washington Ship Canal. When they’re migrating upriver, visitors can see salmon jumping in the fish ladder; not today.

However, we did visit these statues, which mimic wave curls. They’re by Paul Sorey, and called “Salmon Waves” (2001).

Bascule bridge SEA

This is the Salmon Bay Railroad Bridge across the Bay/Ship Canal. It’s a bascule bridge; it is due to be replaced with a vertical-lift bridge very soon, which means today was probably our last chance to see it….

I lost my sense of scale

Sunrise Iowa

Between sunrise in Iowa…

Sunset wyoming

…and sunset in Wyoming….

Sculpture garden

…we found a sculpture garden in a field, including a massive bull’s head (I assume bull(?)) and carefully propped up horse.

Dignity ChamberlainSD

And, with her back to the Missouri River at Chamberlain SD, we found “Dignity: of Earth & Sky” (by Dale Lamphere), an even more massive presence at some fifty feet in height.

Dignity star

In the late afternoon light, the star quilt pattern was magnificent viewed from behind as the sunlight came through the blue panels. Most visitors never look at the back, and when you notice the armature (is that what it is?) on the facing side, it becomes clear you are meant to also walk around the back of the figure. I think, given that today was the 24th of December, that her alternate name should be Madonna of the Missouri.

Hay in flats

Quite a different kind of sculpture: the giant round hay bales.

And I’m tired. Carry on.