architecture

Diary using photos

Cozy livingroom

Our cozy living room….

Log playhouse

An artsy shot of one side of the log playhouse…sized for kids.

Nights veggies

Veggies fresh from the neighbors’ garden, and headed for our dinner table: kale, tomatoes, maize. Yum.

Yay for devices!

Night light

Been missing the sunset light. We also don’t have the sunrise light here, but I’m not always up for it…. And in the UP, we see the sunset sky, but not the actual sunset. Unless we walk over the hill. Which we sometimes do.

These days, we have the option of sending up Droney!

Frames a-changing

Gold dome

The Guru took Droney up. Look at that gleaming gold dome!

Flower insect

In a closer frame of reference, see the stalking insect! They enjoy flowers, too.

Am I writing for five-year-olds?

On the move

Toyota skipper killer

Toyota model skipper trapper killer. Sorry guys/ladies.

Murky at bridge

Bridge crossing was murky with the Great Lakes version of the marine layer.

Northern LP barn

By several miles south of the bridge, we were in the heat that blankets the southern/lower peninsula. Barn of northern LP.

Southern LP barn

Barn of southern LP; more active agriculture here.

Mosque turn mosque

We did the mosque turn differently than the highway version. Pretty light this time of day.

Nern Ohio barn

We stayed in the mid-summer Golden Hour in the next state south. This is a northern Ohio barn. Plenty of agricultural evidence here.

We’re holed up in AC and boring architecture. Works for us tonight!

Excursion SW day

Fayette droneshot

We headed out early, down the Garden Peninsula to the ghost town of Fayette. Here’s the business part of town, where workers made charcoal pig iron for 24 years. The market began to decline and the hardwoods they made the charcoal from were no longer nearby…and, pfft, an industrial town went out of business.

Harbor pilings

I always take harbor-pilings photos. The water seemed higher than the last few years.

Big Spring raft

We made our return via Kitch-iti-kipi, the Big Spring. Love the raft ride, powered by park visitors’ arms.

Big Spring trout

More trout(?) that I ever remember seeing swam in the depths as we made our slow crossing and return.

Hot day; good day to avoid outdoor chores by going sight-seeing!

Expanding my horizons

Lit lily

I was out early as temps were predicted to reach 90°F, and the low-angle sunlight was stunning on this lily.

Indoors, I did some reading about khirigsuurs, Bronze and Early Iron Age civic-ceremonial monumental stone constructions in Mongolia I’d not “heard” of before. I did not find out how the word is pronounced, although GooTranslate indicates it includes Mongolian, but the software/database doesn’t “recognize” the word khirigsuur.

Off season chores

Roland Garros

Without planning to, one of our Paris wanders last March took us by Court Philippe Chatrier at Roland Garros. Lots of construction going on on the lanes between the courts. Of course, no tennis players in sight, only construction workers and perhaps engineers(?), also wearing boots and hard hats…but their clothes were clean…and they tended to carry rolls of charts/maps(?).

Urban picnic

Window lights

We picnicked tonight—the kind of picnic where we go to the neighborhood deli and get goodies, then take them to…tahdah!…our niece’s new place,* her first with her fiancé. Yay.

And the rich desserts did me in. The happy kind….

* Interesting window patterns in the new place, a duplex in a nice old neighborhood not far from our own. Humid out tonight, drippy humid, so it was good to eat inside in the AC….

Eastbound

Lighting mural

We met long-time, rarely seen friends at the restaurant of a Pueblo center honoring the nineteen pueblos of New Mexico for a languid brunch. I found the architectural details quite interesting. This lighting inset with mural: fun.

Dance circle

And in the courtyard, a dance circle. No one was dancing when we checked, but I liked seeing the linear footstep patterns that gave clues to the patterns of the dancers’ movements.

Leftover conference

And, while the ladies retired to the restroom, the gentlemen chatted carefully holding the leftovers. Great guys!

Solo beeve

Then it was time to begin the eastward trek. Over the first pass, we were in rangeland again.

NM penasco

However, we had a few miles of colorful, rugged landscape to go.

NM strata cerro

Rugged, colorful, and stratigraphic.

NM lnscp w train

And, sometimes, complete with train.

Tucumcari irrigation

Then, by Tucumcari, we found row crops in irrigated fields. Grain?

TX windfarm

Somehow, when westbound we did not notice how large this wind farm is in the TX panhandle. Gigantic. Operated by a division of Southern Company. [Goo-ing indicates this is the Cactus Flats facility, with 43 wind turbines.]

TX wind cattle

Very Texas to have cattle and wind plants coexisting. Jessayin: we went through TX twice on this trip, and never set foot in the state. [You can only manage that if you pick the section of TX you cross VERY carefully; we picked the panhandle.]

OK sunset

OK sunset.

I was going to title this “Don Dinero,” but it didn’t fit. We saw a pawnshop with that name in ABQ; “Don Dinero” means Mr Money.

Adobe-city

Wooden patio bench

The other day I learned that the city of Santa Fé’s architecture overseers permit forty-four shades of adobe, whether of clay, or of the far more common cement stuccoing (if I have it right).

Lilac artsy gal

I realized by the end of today, that I had a bunch of shots with different adobe(like) walls in them.

Sectioned giant head

So, here’s a chance for you to compare shades/hues/tints/colors.

Messy wisteria patio

What names would you use for the various, um, terra cotta shades?

Maybe vibernum

It seems I also managed to get a bunch of flower pictures today.

Canyon road long wall

The flower colors—and organic shadow shapes—do highlight the natural light brown shades of the walls.

Canyon Road dorr

I also like the weathered wood matched with the adobe.

Canyon Road gallery porch

This building is not unusual in having different parts/wings/walls in different shades, and in having the normally shadowed porch the lightest shade of all.

Window Mark White garden

That large tree-trunk shadow is from a cottonwood, álamo in Spanish.

Maybe apple

This is probably some kind of ornamental apple.

Parking lot n beyond

Here are shade-variations on commercial buildings downtown.

Upon reflection, photographing the adobe walls was easier than naming the shades, and far more interesting.