language

New vocab (again)

Purple fleur

The other day I came across the word “eidolon/eidola” (singular/plural), Greek for a look-alike phantom for a person, in their case, especially applied to Helen of Troy. [And in Greek letters: εἴδωλον].

The Guru and I are binge-watching a Canadian TV series called “Continuum,” which has character duplicates, which I think can be called eidola.

Too many doubles. Here’s a single purple fleur; buds don’t count—my rules.

Learn-a-word

Night sight

I’m such a sucker for new vocabulary words. I like those adopted from another language. And I sometimes have a soft spot for technical/specific vocabularies. Today I came across this term for a particular leaf vein pattern: campylodromous. Of course, when I did some research, it turns out there are a whole suite of vein pattern classification-names that I don’t remember seeing before. Not that useful, but descriptive terms, yeah…soft spot. [Details: see Wkeepee here.]

Ghosting

Phone pole number aging

Several things about these numerals aging in place on this wooden phone/power pole are interesting. What compelled me to photograph it was that the body of the pole is clearly significantly eroded, leaving the metal pedestalled on the original surface.

Appearance and disappearance

Heracleum watch it

Pretty sure this is the Heracleum that is not friendly to the skin–sap makes the human skin photosensitive, causing blistering and burning (wild/cow parsnip).

A couple of years ago I saw one flourishing over the hill, but this one is by our beach!

Pondering how to carefully remove the plant with no…downstream negative effects…no burns, skin blistering or brown streaks that can last over a year!

Moon over Whitefish Lake

Moon over Whitefish Lake. Which used to have whitefish in it, I have read. Most people don’t call it that anymore…because? no whitefish? I prefer the old name to the modern one: South Manistique Lake.

Just before iocane powder

Lantana

“Only the Princess matters.” Line from: The Princess Bride,” in the scene just before the Battle of Wits scene, in which we learned about Australian iocane powder.

Zoom zoom

Wrecker art

You can never tell what advertising you might encounter on the open road. Here’s a well-logo’d giant wrecker. On the lower right: PERT—Peachtree Environmental Response Team. Huh. Also in green: Certified WRECKMASTER. And we waited alongside this vehicular power house at a mundane red light. Just our modest/tiny sedan.

Sunset piedmont

Later, whew, some gorgeous sky.

Zoom zoom.

Wordiness

GooFi rent

Someone thought this lone, highlightable, benefit might cinch a deal—fast. Turns out maybe the rate’s too high or something else, as this sign has been posted for a while.

Lily blushing

Yeah, and a flower photo. Interesting color. Light plum? Blushing orchid? Rosy something?

Expanding my horizons

Lit lily

I was out early as temps were predicted to reach 90°F, and the low-angle sunlight was stunning on this lily.

Indoors, I did some reading about khirigsuurs, Bronze and Early Iron Age civic-ceremonial monumental stone constructions in Mongolia I’d not “heard” of before. I did not find out how the word is pronounced, although GooTranslate indicates it includes Mongolian, but the software/database doesn’t “recognize” the word khirigsuur.

Tremulous in the Ether

Chair shadows

Ether in the 17th C was everything between things. I heard the title phrase somewhere, noted it, and forgot where I heard it*. Well, it’s noted again, for whatever it’s worth. Is this ether more like the sunlight or the shadows? Still pondering…but not tremulous (timid, nervous, shaking, or quivering) in the pondering.

* Yeah, should have noted source as well as phrase. My bad.

Other names

False indigo

Plants typically have multiple names. For example, these look like lupines, but are not. They are in the greater legume family, however. They provided a good blue dye, hence their name: false indigo.

Dogwood kousa

And this dogwood is the Korean type, aka kousa* dogwood.

* How did autocorrect change this word to “mouse”? Or, why is that a match? This is not the same kind of multiple names as with the false indigo….